Ozzy Osbourne reveals Parkinson’s diagnosis

What You Need to Know: Ozzy Osbourne

“The Prince of Darkness” has opened up about a health battle he’s facing.

During an interview with “Good Morning America," Ozzy Osbourne revealed he has been diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease.

The diagnosis came after he fell last February.

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Osbourne’s wife, Sharon Osbourne, explained that it is PRKN 2 that affects nerves in the body, ABC News reported.

Ozzy Osbourne had to postpone his world tour as he recovered from the fall and learned how to live with Parkinson’s.

HIs “No More Tours 2” tour was scheduled to start this month, but has been postponed until October, NBC News reported.

The Black Sabbath frontman has been having tremors for years, USA Today reported. There have been rumors of the rocker having Parkinson’s but in the past, and until recently he had denied it, ABC News reported.

Parkinson’s is caused when nerve cells that control movement in the brain that either become impaired or die. The neurons create less dopamine that causes movement issues in Parkinson’s patients. But doctors don’t know what causes the cells to either stop working or die, according to the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute on Aging.

Symptoms of Parkinson’s disease include:

  • Tremors in the hands, arms, legs, jaw or head.
  • Stiffness of the limbs and trunk.
  • Slowness of movement.
  • Impaired balance and coordination that can lead to falling.

Many patients also have depression and emotional changes and may have difficulty swallowing, chewing and speaking among other symptoms, the NIH reported.

FILE PHOTO: Ozzy Osbourne of Black Sabbath performs at Ozzfest 2016 at San Manuel Amphitheater on September 24, 2016 in Los Angeles, California. Osbourne has announced he has been diagnosed with Parkinson's disease.
FILE PHOTO: Ozzy Osbourne of Black Sabbath performs at Ozzfest 2016 at San Manuel Amphitheater on September 24, 2016 in Los Angeles, California. Osbourne has announced he has been diagnosed with Parkinson's disease. (Frazer Harrison/Getty Images)