Burmese python swallows whole baby white-tailed deer weighing more than itself

A Burmese python, similar to the one pictured here, was captured in Collier-Seminole State Park in Naples, Fla. It had eaten a baby white-tailed deer that was bigger than itself.

NAPLES, Fla. — The Burmese python is on Florida’s most-wanted list when it comes to invasive species. The snake could devastate parts of the state’s ecosystem and cause environmental damage.

>> Read more trending news

A good example surfaced recently when the Conservancy of Southwest Florida captured a Burmese python engorged on a baby white-tailed deer.

The group documented the snake eating the deer and then regurgitating the animal in Collier-Seminole State Park in Naples, Fla., in 2015.

“This is believed to be the largest predator/prey ratio ever documented for the Burmese python, and possibly for any species of python,” organization officials said in a post on Facebook.

Warning: Some people may find the images in the article below disturbing. The Conservancy of Southwest Florida...

Posted by Conservancy of Southwest Florida on Thursday, March 1, 2018

“This observation is another important piece of evidence for the negative impact invasive Burmese pythons are having on native wildlife across the Greater Everglades Ecosystem,” Conservancy biologist Ian Bartoszek said during a press conference on the incident.

“Imagine the potential consequences to the state and federally protected Florida panther if Burmese pythons adversely affect the number of white-tailed deer, a panther’s primary prey,” Bartoszek said.

The Burmese python is a constrictor and one of the largest snakes on the planet.

The group studied the incident and recorded details that will be published in the March 2018 issue of Herpetological Review.

Conservancy scientists are also tracking about 20 pythons as part of a fieldwork project into python behavior in order to learn more about the snakes. They’re hoping the project will help them control and manage the population.

The Conservancy of Southwest Florida documented a Burmese python eating a white-tailed deer that weighed more than the python itself. This is believed to be the largest predator/prey ratio ever documented for the Burmese python, and possibly for any species of python. The findings will be published in the March 2018 issue of Herpetological Review. Watch as Conservancy Biologist Ian Bartoszek gives a press event to local media outlets about the find.

Posted by Conservancy of Southwest Florida on Thursday, March 1, 2018