• Animals at Florida conservation center lend their voices to ‘Game of Thrones' dragons

    By: Ann Smajstrla, Cox Media Group National Content Desk

    Updated:

    YULEE, Fla. - “Game of Thrones” fans may be familiar with the fact that production for the show took place in exotic locations like CroatiaIceland and Spain. But fans may not know that some of the sounds for the show’s dragons were recorded closer to home in Florida.

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    Paula Fairfield, the sound designer "Game of Thrones," visited White Oak Conservation in Yulee to find the voice of Danerys’ dragons in the latest season. She used sounds from the conservation center’s rhinos and cranes to bring the mythical creature to life.

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

    Today is Endangered Species Day, so throughout the day, we will post photos of some of the endangered species that can be found at White Oak. But we thought we'd start with something a little different. As you know from a previous post, a couple of White Oak's species were featured in the most recent season of Game of Thrones. Sound designer Paula Fairfield used our rhinos' (and cranes') voices to help bring her dragons' voices to life. She felt that using endangered species vocalizations was important: "We live in a world where our animals are disappearing at a rapid rate," she said. "So it's powerful for me to listen to their beautiful voices and use them in this space." As the GOT series winds down, we thought we'd show you how the sounds were collected. And if you want to learn more about the now-famous rhinos at White Oak, be sure to sign up for our Rhinogram at www.whiteoakdwildlife.org/rhinogram. #endangeredspeciesday #saverhinos #GOT @eargasminc

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    A video posted to Instagram by White Oak shows Fairfield crouching near the rhino’s enclosure with a microphone. Fairfield told White Oak that using vocalizations from endangered animals was important to her.

    “We live in a world where our animals are disappearing at a rapid rate," Fairfield said, according to the post. "So it's powerful for me to listen to their beautiful voices and use them in this space."

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