Shining Honor enhances lives by honoring those who've died

TULSA, Okla. — A group in Tulsa is enhancing lives by honoring veterans who have died.

Tulsa-based Shining Honor Project is cleaning thousands of headstones of veterans and their families.

In partnership with Gateway, which has provided support and opportunities for people with developmental challenges for more than 50 years, the Shining Honor Project is moving forward in Tulsa with its dual mission, paying respect for those who have served our country and paying more than minimum wage for a job well-done.

The Tulsa Historical Society provided the group with expertise on restoring headstones and using certain chemicals and shampoos similar to the process used at Arlington National Cemetery.

Shining Honor hopes to give men and women who may feel detached from the world around them a connection to their communities and with their country.

The group has cleaned more than 3,500 headstones in three Tulsa cemeteries -- Memorial Park, Clinton Oaks and Oaklawn.

The project relies on donations.