Vandalism from riots generally covered by insurance

State Insurance Commissioner Glen Mulready explains what people should know about property damage in light of vandalism surrounding protests.

OKLA. — State Insurance Commissioner Glen Mulready explains what people should know about property damage in light of vandalism surrounding protests.

Commissioner Mulready says most commercial insurance companies will cover things like riots, vandalism, and damage caused by civil unrest. Many plans have a separate coverage for plate glass, so businesses may not be covered for shattered windows if they don’t have the specific insurance.

One local business in Tulsa says they weren’t damaged, but checked with their insurance company to see if they’d be covered during a protest. The insurance company told them it may not be covered, as it could be considered an act of terrorism. Some policies have terrorist-specific coverage that businesses can purchase.

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Commissioner Mulready says it would be a stretch to designate recent protests as anything more than civil commotion, and he wants to hear from any business facing this issue from insurers.

Basic commercial insurance often doesn’t cover the business lost from damage, if a business is forced to shut down for several days to clean up. Businesses may want to opt for business loss when purchasing insurance.

Mulready says each business must weight the cost benefit for all of their insurance options.

If you do have damage, it’s important that you first secure the business from any further damage, like with plywood- then contact an insurance adjuster as soon as possible.

If you are filing an insurance claim and feel you are being treated unfairly, contact the state insurance commissioner’s office at 1 800-522-0071, or file a complaint online at oid.ok.gov