Election held in Oklahoma on Tuesday

VIDEO: Election boards prepare for November

TULSA, Okla. — Voters headed to the polls Tuesday to decide Tulsa’s next mayor, several council seats and five city propositions.

The Tulsa County Election Board said more than 27,000 absentee ballots were requested, about four times as many from the 2016 mayoral election.

Fifty counties had elections Tuesday, according to the Oklahoma State Election Board.

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SAFETY PROTOCOLS

The State Election Board worked with OU Health Sciences Center to develop safety protocols for all of Oklahoma’s polling places and county election boards, including social distancing procedures and disinfection requirements for voting equipment and surfaces. Poll workers at every location have been supplied with personal protective equipment (PPE) including hand sanitizer, gloves, masks, and disinfectant.

Voters are asked to be patient and follow signage and procedures. While it is not required, state election officials strongly recommend that voters wear a mask or face covering to protect themselves and those around them.

Find more on COVID-19 and the 2020 elections on the State Election Board website.

PROOF OF IDENTITY

Oklahoma law requires every voter who votes in person to show proof of identity before receiving a ballot.

There are three ways for voters to prove their identity under the law. (Only one proof of identity is required):

  • Show a valid photo ID issued by the federal, state, or tribal government; or
  • Show the free voter identification card issued to every voter by their County Election Board; or
  • Sign an affidavit and vote a provisional ballot. (If the information on the affidavit matches official voter registration records, the ballot will be counted after Election Day.)

State and county election officials are always your trusted sources for information. Visit the State Election Board website to learn more about elections in Oklahoma.

Polls are open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Election Day. Lines at the polls are typically longest before work, during the lunch hour, and after work.