Local organizations raise awareness on bullying prevention education

TULSA, Okla. — Counseling and Recovery Services of Oklahoma says two studies show that cyberbullying went down during the pandemic. Experts say this is because bullying starts in person, then usually transitions to the internet and social media.

With kids back in the classroom, parents should keep an eye out for declining grades, a loss on interest in school, and low self-esteem in their children. Parents are also encouraged to educate their kids about standing up for their friends and peers when they see someone getting bullied.

Sara Mahan with Counseling and Recovery Services of Oklahoma says bullying can negatively effect a child’s mental health.

“Out of that stems a lot of anxiety, nervousness to go to school, nervous to act with these peers, I’m nervous at what’s going to happen,” said Mahan.

The organizations is part of some area schools to assist students who may need help. They have a list of resources on their website for parents who might, too, need a little extra help.

https://crsok.org/wraparound-tulsa/