95-year-old Muskogee County woman donates ranch to Oklahoma State University

Elizabeth Logan, a 95-year-old resident of Haskell, donated property for ag research

HASKELL, Okla. — At 95-years-old, Elizabeth Logan says she has had many loves in her life: her husband George W., horses and Logan Ranch.

Logan has lived on the ranch in Haskell for more than 50 years.

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“We bought the farm in 1970 and built the house,” Logan said. “We raised beef cattle and quarter horses. George W. loved the outdoors and loved the horses.”

Her love for horses didn’t begin until later, though.

“I was afraid of horses until my husband had open-heart surgery in 1995,” Logan said. “He had a barn full of studs, and I had to take care of them during his recovery. Finally, I just got more comfortable with them.”

Shortly after, she began to start showing horses.

“George W. had a yearling filly, Scottish Nurse, that I took a shine to,” she said. “I came in one evening after feeding and told George W. that I was going to show Scottish Nurse. He about fell out of the chair. I told him that I’m going to make her high point filly of Oklahoma the next year, and I did.”

Logan had success showing horses for 20 years until she was 88 years old. However, her journey with horses did not end there.

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About six years ago, Logan got into the racehorse business.

She started with Chrome Kisses her first year, then acquired Batter Up and Josey Wales the next. Logan got her first win with Batter Up. When her horses would do well, she would use the prize money to buy more. She currently has nine racehorses.

In 2019, she won the Oklahoma Futurity at Remington Park with EC Revenge. She won it again in 2022 with Tres Crystals.

“I can’t tell you how exciting it is to win the Oklahoma Futurity not once but twice,” she said. “When my horse ran it the first time, it was the biggest thrill of my life. I get thrilled every time; it doesn’t matter. My trainer has had horses in the futurity to run, but he has never won it. Now we’ve won it twice, so he’s thrilled, too.”

While Logan has a big legacy, she has no children to leave it to.

In 1999, the couple decided to donate their estate, including their ranch, to the Oklahoma State University Foundation for agricultural research after their passing.

Logan has taken care of the ranch since George W.’s passing in 2011. She recently decided, however, to donate the property while she’s still living.

“I’ve been blessed; I really have,” Logan said. “I decided there’s no better time than now.”

The decision to donate spurred from a trip to Stillwater in 1983. When their champion mare, Bandy, was treated at OSU College of Veterinary Medicine.

She says the veterinarians there found the problem when other veterinarians couldn’t.

“OSU gave us more time with her. They were so good to save our mare; that instigated us to give OSU the farm,” she said.

Chris Richards, director of the field and research service unit for OSU Ag Research, said they plan to use the property to for cattle grazing, weed control and fertilization research.

In addition to donating the property, the Logans started a scholarship fund for students entering OSU’s veterinary program.

“George W. always said we’ve worked for what we’ve got,” Logan said. “Because of what OSU did for us, we decided to try to help someone else or other students who are going to college.”