TU warns students of check scam


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(Dontaye Carter)
(Dontaye Carter)
Updated: 11/05/2012 9:08 am Published: 11/03/2012 5:20 pm


The University of Tulsa is alerting students about a growing problem with scams on campus.

"I was kind of surprised," said Ben Kramer, a senior at TU.

He was shocked to hear students are being targeted by scammers giving students counterfeit checks.

The University sent out this email below to students Friday:

“The University of Tulsa is alerting students to the growing problem of fake check scams. There have been reported incidents of attempted check scams on campus. A new scam involves counterfeit checks that seem legitimate to bank employees and consumers, but they leave unsuspecting consumers footing the bill. If you receive any suspicious documents that may be a scam, contact TU Campus Security or the Tulsa Police Department.”


"I always feel like if it's too good to be true then don't try to go after,” said another student, Julie DeLeon.  “Always stand your guard."

"Free money is always a bad thing," said Kramer.

He told FOX23 that is exactly what his mother tells him. The senior says these alerts from the school go a long way with helping students be prepared.

"I'm glad I have the awareness. If it happens, if something comes up, now I know about it," Kramer said.

The university also sent out fraud prevention tips to the students.

“Do not respond to suspicious e-mails or mailings. It’s usually best to delete the email or throw the mailing away. Fake payment scams are designed to sound believable. Scammers actively search for victims online. Counterfeit checks, money orders and currency look very real, and can even fool bank staff. Under federal law, banks must make deposited funds available quickly. Just because you withdraw the money from a cashed check, doesn't mean the check is good. It can often take weeks to discovery forgeries. Financial institutions that lose money as a result of cashing a fraudulent check expect to recoup their loss, often at the expense of the victim. You are responsible for your transactions. There is no legitimate reason for someone who is giving you payment to ask you to send money back. Insist on getting paid the exact amount. Trust your instincts. If a business proposition seems suspicious, then don't engage in the transaction.”


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The views expressed here do not necessarily represent those of KOKI FOX23 - Tulsa

aleman - 11/5/2012 5:42 AM
0 Votes
Uhh...aren't university students supposed to be smart?

Mayor Maynot - 11/3/2012 10:49 PM
0 Votes
If you didn't do anything to earn the money then it's a no brainer.
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